(Un)Limited Pleasure

Linde Voorend

(Un)Limited pleasure is a documentary about experiencing sexuality, partnership and the body. In thirty minutes, Menko Dijksterhuis, Nynke Koelma and Vincent Olrichs make us think about what these experiences enclose when being in a wheelchair. On the one hand, what prejudices exist around the ‘disabled body’ and how does this influence the ways in which they experience sexuality and partnership. On the other, what dimensions of sex, intimacy and partnership do their experiences present that society ignores in for example pornography of romantic movies? This documentary shows that all human beings need and want to experience sexuality and partnership and questions the ways in which we do this.

Poster - (Un)limited Pleasure

Trailer

Bio

Linde Voorend
Linde Voorend

Linde Voorend (22 years old) is an anthropologist in heart and soul. Her choice for the visual Ethnography master programme was fuelled by her drive to make anthropological topics known by a larger audience. Her work is characterized by a slightly activist stance within the anthropological field which results in a collaborative approach that runs through her documentary. Next year, she will continue to make anthropological topics more approachable, this time for kids at a secondary school.

How Can I Help?

Lotte Fillerup

We follow Leonardo during the last weeks before and the first weeks after the arrival of his first child, focussing on his fathering practices, emotions and the social support he receives. Finally, he reflects on the impact of COVID-19 on his experience. The film experiments with colors and non-synchronized storytelling to illuminate different emotions and phases Leonardo experiences.

Poster - How Can I Help

Trailer

Bio

Lotte Fillerup
Lotte Fillerup

My name is Lotte Fillerup and I am 24 years old. I chose this master because of the multimodel and experimental aspects of the study.

Tacit Traces

Simone Loth

My story illustrates how interrelated and conflicting narratives of self-identification as mixed-race raise issues about intergenerational trauma from the past and its emotional impact on the present. The film conveys the different perspectives from which I and each of my two family members negotiate our ethnic backgrounds and conveys the emotional load that came to the fore in the process of seeking out questions about our history and the ‘inherited silence’ as part of our Indo heritage.

Poster - Tacit Traces

Trailer

Bio

Simone Loth
Simone Loth

Simone Loth, 29:

“I initially considered applying for this master’s as the cherry on top of the cake when it comes to studying. In hindsight, it has been one of the most fruitful years for me regarding my personal development. It is through this program and research project that I found the strength in being vulnerable and embracing a certain sensitivity. Eventually, this process taught me to unmute myself. With this master’s degree I am hoping to pursue a career that allows me to put my research skills and interest in audiovisual work into practice, in particular in the field of linguistics or linguistic anthropology.”

Manga Mine

Jonas Bach

How do we respectfully navigate an increasingly culturally pluralistic society in a time in which belonging and not belonging, inclusion and exclusion, ownership and appropriation have become global hot topics? Cultural authenticity and hybridity seem, at times, mutually exclusive and hypocritical as we come to consider cultural identity. ‘Manga Mine’ is a collaborative graphic novel exploring notions of ‘Asianness’, cultural authorship, authenticity and identity through a part auto-ethnographic, part participatory visual project centred on the medium of Manga and its significance as a material culture, but also a contested space in which cultures interact, hybridise or clash. By tracing and quite literally drawing out individual lived experiences of Manga and Anime enthusiasts, ‘Manga Mine’ serves as a reminder that identities are plural. That experiences are shared but also unique. That material objects such as Manga carry vast and numerous significances. And that cultural identity is a topic which we must navigate with respect and willingness to reflect and renegotiate.

Poster - Manga Mine

Trailer

Bio

Jonas Bach
Jonas Bach

I was born into a mixed family. My father is German, my mother Taiwanese. I grew up in the Netherlands, and the older I got, the more I became aware of a cultural conflict within myself, within my upbringing and with my surroundings. Guilt over not being ‘Asian’ enough struggled against an environment that continuously told me that I was. My bachelor in East Asian Area Studies was motivated by both curiosity but also guilt of exploring my supposed identity, and ultimately made me feel even more detatched. I felt ‘inauthentic’. I ultimately chose this masters because it, to me, closes a gap between art and academia which I feel are needlessly kept seperated and distinguished between.

This masters and my project have been a somewhat painful but also incredibly rich experience. Whilst the practical skills we acquired are something I cherish and hope to continue applying in the future, what still leaves me astounded is the reflexivity, self awareness and sensitivity that this study has taught me. This masters has taught me to be simultaneously open minded and critical, empathetic and analytical.

It has been a transformative, informative, and, at times, difficult year and I am thankful for every person I had the privilege of sharing that year with, through tears, laughs and pear reviews.

Back

Lenne Michiels

BACK is an interactive desktop documentary. It was created in a year in which a lot of us became familiar with remote working due to COVID-19. Interestingly digital nomads have been working remotely already for years. This i-doc gives the audience a chance to research the dynamics between emotional sustainability and digital nomadism. What influences the emotional state of being of those ‘digital nomads’ and to which extent does this make the lived experience as a digital nomad tentable, durable and desired for a longer time?

Poster - Back

Trailer

Bio

Lenne Michiels
Lenne Michiels (24)

“The power of image and sound to generate surprising insights and emotions has always fascinated me. I believe that it creates a chance to make complicated topics accessible for a broad public without losing its complexity. For years now it has been my dream to work with this ‘magic’ and I believe the masters programme gave me a taste of how much (hard work, but also) fun it is to proceed this dream! I have not only learned the technicalities of doing visual research and working towards a multimodal output, I have also learned a lot about my own way of working and how much a supporting group of people around you can mean in a year of crisis.”

WaterWays

Geerte Rietveld

We see trucks, cargo ships, inland ships, planes and trains passing by on a daily basis, yet very few of us have any idea of the lives that are lived aboard. Families that live and grow up on ships, in constant mobility, live according to another rhythm than the rest of society. The physical visibility versus social invisibility of transportation jobs stands central to Waterways. The film allows the viewer to experience the way of life of the inland shippers by showing and engaging with the diverse crews on four different ships. This portrait-based film proposes the base for the concept Transport Nomad. A nomad, which although set right in the middle of western capitalism, clashes with this society’s expectation of sedentary living.
The photo series, of the same name, can be found in the social sciences faculty building, Pieter de la Court, as well as on www.geerterietveld.com .

Poster - WaterWays

Trailer

Bio

Geerte Rietveld
Geerte Rietveld

Geerte (1996) studied international humanitarian action at the university of Groningen. For her thesis she researched the impact of mass media on public and political action and awareness around the disappearances of unaccompanied refugee children from Dutch refugee centres. This research showed the importance of correct discourse and imaging as they had (in this case) a direct impact on policy making. Therefore, she chose that she wanted to contribute to more correct and victim centered humanitarian media. The master in visual ethnography was then an obvious choice for the way in which students are put in charge of their research projects, taking all steps in the creation of ethnographic visual content. She was very happy to gain the necessary skills for people-centered filmmaking, but more importantly: this year confirmed for her that this is what she wants to do. Now, she interns in the communications department of MSF in Paris.

What ever happened to Jean Rouch’s 2CV

Jerome Blumberg

In 1995, anthropologist and filmmaker Jean Rouch gave me his old 2CV.

In 2004, after he died in Niger, I moved to Amsterdam with the car, but it soon became too rotten to go on the road and I dreamt to be able to fix it.

It happened in the first weeks of 2021, when its reconstruction, as well as the ethnography of the small world around that very special car, became the object of my fieldwork for a Visual Ethnography Master’s degree in Leiden University.

Exploring the concept of bricolage, the film narrates this adventure through several characters encountered along the way.

Poster - What ever happened to Jean Rouch’s 2CV

Trailer

Bio

Jerome Blumberg
Jerome Blumberg

Jerome Blumberg, born in 1951 in Paris, is a filmmaker and father of 4. He graduated in Film studies  from Paris 7 University and has been making movies since 1971. After moving to Holland in 2005, he filmed Encounter with the Frisian Skûtsjes.  In 2021, he graduated in Visual Ethnography from Leiden University.

Reading Fragments In The Flow

Chen Zhang

In the past year, Covid-19 and lockdown forced people to pay more attention to others nearby. As a result, the situation of essential yet lower-end workers became a more visible topic in public discussions in Mandarin mass media. Before going overseas, some Chinese migrant workers experienced a career as flexible as non-skilled workers.

Under this condition, Chen talked with several Chinese chefs working at Asian restaurants in the Netherlands. This film documented her encounter with two chefs, Xiaolou and Yuan. What is the meaning of working abroad for these men? How does overseas life feel like? This film is also about her exploration of herself. In what way should we understand a flexible career like this?

Poster - Reading Fragments in the Flow

Trailer

Bio

Chen Zhang
Chen Zhang

Chen Zhang is 23 years old. She studied Anthropology in her bachelor intending to understand others better. She has also worked as a graphic designer and a broadcast editor in her student jobs. Regardless of the form she creates content, she always wants to express certain ideas precisely. These desires led her to this master program.

These migrant workers’ stories guided her to explore herself. People might share a similar sense of self no matter what kind of life they are living. Nobody is an island. This is the biggest thing she has learned this year.

WeChat where the home is

Tamara Uildriks

Wechat Where the Home Is, is about how three Chinese international students use the app WeChat to feel at home in the Netherlands. WeChat is one of the most used social media in China. While few Dutch people use it, the app remains popular among the many Chinese students in the Netherlands. This popularity abroad evokes the question of what this platform has to offer for people living in a different country and how it relates to a sense of ‘home’.

Poster - WeChat where the home is

Trailer

Bio

Tamara Uildriks
Tamara Uildriks

Tamara Uildriks, 23 y/o:
“The biggest thing I learned this year, and am still learning, is the many ways of visualizing an argument, how to create a coherent story from visual footage, trying to find a way through the many hours of footage that is understandable and attractive to people not present during the research. I chose this master as an addition to my background in journalism. I wanted to learn how to make a documentary, by actually making one within a given period of time.”

Eat The Artifact

Emma Regeni

By considering food making as a way to reenact diasporic memories and cultural identity among Indo-Surinamese migrants in the Netherlands, “Eat the Artifact” attempts to link people and objects in a non-linear way. The project elaborates on the mutually constitutive relationship between bodies and food, and on cooking as a performance. The exploration of alternative modalities to do research on embodied knowledge resulted in the production of a series of Surinamese traditional food in ceramics, in which physical objects are handled as meaningful cultural constructs rather than inert matter.

Poster - Eat the Artifact

Trailer

Bio

Emma Regeni
Emma Regeni

Emma Regeni (Udine 1997) lives and works in The Hague, NL:

“This year has been about learning how to adapt to the circumstances while keeping touch with what makes me, me. The Visual Ethnography master programme has represented an ideal platform in this regard, challenging me to strive toward my vision and providing a stimulating environment of growth and collaboration.”